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  • Air-Launched 2.75-Inch Rockets
    A and the U S Army s current 70 mm LWLs Light Weight Launchers are the M260 7 round and M261 19 round All other 2 75 rocket pods are effectively no longer in use presumably because they are not compatible with the MK 66 motor Photo U S Army Hydra 70 system A wide selection of warheads most of which were originally developed for the MK 4 40 FFARs is available for the MK 66 Hydra 70 rocket These include M151 3 95 kg 8 7 lb anti personnel fragmentation warhead M156 White phosphorus smoke warhead M229 7 3 kg 16 1 lb anti personnel fragmentation warhead elongated version of M151 M247 Shaped charge anti armour warhead M255 Flechette warhead contains about 2500 28 grain 1 8 g flechettes M255E1 has 1180 60 grain 3 8 g flechettes M257 Parachute retarded battlefield illumination flare M259 White Phosphorus smoke warhead M261 High explosive MPSM Multipurpose Submunition warhead contains nine M73 anti personnel anti materiel bomblets which are released in mid air and drag retarded to fall vertically to the ground M264 Red phosphorus smoke warhead M267 Practice warhead for M261 contains three M75 practice submunitions M274 Practice warhead for M151 contains a smoke signature charge M278 Parachute retarded infrared illumination flare MK 67 MOD 0 White phosphorus smoke warhead MK 67 MOD 1 Red phosphorus smoke warhead WDU 4A A Flechette warhead contains about 2200 20 grain 1 3 g flechettes WTU 1 B Inert practice warhead Drawing General Dynamics Hydra 70 warheads The following table lists the basic characteristics length weight of Hydra 70 rockets with the warhead fuze combinations currently used by the U S Navy Warhead Warhead Type Fuze Options Length Weight M151 Anti Personnel M423 M427 MK 352 138 2 cm 54 39 in 10 4 kg 22 95 lb M156 Smoke White Phosphorus M423 M427 MK 352 140 0 cm 55 13 in 10 5 kg 23 25 lb M257 Illumination visible M442 186 1 cm 73 25 in 11 1 kg 24 45 lb M278 Illumination IR MK 67 MOD 0 Smoke White Phosphorus M423 M427 MK 352 140 0 cm 55 13 in 8 5 kg 18 75 lb MK 67 MOD 1 Smoke Red Phosphorus M427 MK 352 146 8 cm 57 79 in 10 2 kg 22 52 lb WDU 4A A Flechette Model 113A 142 9 cm 56 25 in 10 4 kg 22 95 lb WTU 1 B Practice n a 140 4 cm 55 30 in 10 5 kg 23 10 lb Hydra 70 rockets were used in large numbers in all recent American armed conflicts They can be fired from essentially all close support aircraft but are primarily used by armed helicopters Production of MK 66 rockets is continuing at General Dynamics under the APKWS Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System program New launcher and motor developments for Hydra 70 are briefly mentioned in the section about other Hydra 70 developments Lockheed BEI ARS In 1991 the U
    http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app4/275in-rockets.html (2012-12-09)


  • Air-Launched 5-Inch Rockets
    A series The exact length and weight of the Zuni depends on the warhead but typical values are 2 79 m 110 in and 48 5 kg 107 lb respectively Photo via Ordway Wakeford Zuni MK 16 Designation Note No formal designations are allocated to all up 5 inch Zuni rockets Instead the rocket type is generally identified by the designation of the motor assembly which is the main body of the rocket and includes nozzle and fins The original production Zuni motor is designated MK 16 and the ultimate variant is the MK 16 MOD 3 The various warheads are typically usable with all available motors and are presumably often fitted to the rockets in the field only briefly before actual use Therefore it was apparently deemed unnecessary to assign MK MOD designations to every specific combination of rocket and payload In fact the original edition of the current designation system for rockets and missiles explicitly excluded unguided line of sight rockets from the system Photo McDonnell Douglas Zuni MK 16 The Zuni was widely used by U S Navy and Marine Corps aircraft in Vietnam However the rocket was also the cause of the worst accident on a modern USN aircraft carrier when a Zuni motor was inadvertently ignited on deck of USS Forrestal in July 1967 MK 71 Zuni The current 5 inch Zuni rockets use the MK 71 motor It uses a smoke less propellant and has a completely new nozzle fin assembly The latter has four wrap around type fins and therefore the MK 71 is sometimes called a WAFAR Wrap Around Fin Aerial Rocket instead of an FFAR The actual diameter of the MK 71 is quoted as 130 mm 5 12 in The MK 71 MOD 0 began to replace the MK 16 in June 1971 but was soon superseded by the MK 71 MOD 1 which entered full production in September 1973 The MK 71 MOD 1 is the only Zuni motor currently in use and is a HERO Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance safe modification of the MOD 0 The MK 71 rockets are fired from LAU 10C A and LAU 10D A 4 tube pods the earlier launcher versions through LAU 10B A being incompatible with the new motor The LAU 10C A is for shore based use only because it lacks the thermal protection coating of the 10D A Photo U S Navy LAU 10C B or 10D B exact model unknown A wide variety of warheads is available for the MK 71 rocket The following table lists the basic characteristics length weight of MK 71 Zuni rockets with the warhead fuze combinations currently used by the U S Navy Warhead Warhead Type Fuze Length Weight MK 24 MOD 0 1 General Purpose MK 93 MOD 0 249 4 cm 98 18 in 56 8 kg 125 2 lb MK 188 MOD 0 240 0 cm 94 48 in MK 352 MOD 2 FMU 90 B MK 32
    http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app4/5in-rockets.html (2012-12-09)

  • LTV SLV-1 Scout
    2A version Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 1 9 14 m 1 14 m 1 Aerojet XM 68 D solid 382 473 N 2 6 19 m 0 76 m 1 Thiokol TX 33 solid 244 690 N 3 2 90 m 0 76 m 1 ABL X 259A solid 93 907 N 4 1 49 m 0 51 m 1 ABL X 258 solid 22 250 N Specifications for Scout X 2B Scout X 2M The next version used a different upper stage the MG 18 Three launches were conducted between 23 May 1962 and 26 April 1963 but only one succeeded in placing a satellite into orbit It was capable of placing a 90 kg payload into a low Earth orbit Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 1 9 14 m 1 14 m 1 Aerojet XM 68 D solid 382 473 N 2 6 19 m 0 76 m 1 Thiokol TX 33 solid 244 690 N 3 2 90 m 0 76 m 1 ABL X 259A solid 93 907 N 4 1 49 m 0 51 m 1 LPC Redlands MG 18 solid Specifications for Scout X 2M Scout X 3 The Scout X 3 introduced a new first stage which allowed a payload of up to 87 kg to be placed into a low Earth orbit Six launches took place from 16 December 1962 to 27 March 1964 Of these one failed and one was sub orbital Photo via Mark Wade Scout X 3 Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 1 9 14 m 1 14 m 1 Aerojet 40KS A solid 458 183 N 2 6 19 m 0 76 m 1 Thiokol TX 33 solid 244 690 N 3 2 90 m 0 76 m 1 ABL X 259A solid 93 907 N 4 1 49 m 0 51 m 1 ABL X 248 solid 13 615 N Specifications for Scout X 3 Scout X 3A The Scout X 3A tested new equipment on a single sub orbital flight on 31 August 1962 Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 1 9 14 m 1 14 m 1 Aerojet 40KS A solid 458 183 N 2 6 19 m 0 76 m 1 Thiokol TX 33 solid 244 690 N 3 2 90 m 0 76 m 1 ABL X 259A solid 93 907 N 4 1 49 m 0 51 m 1 ABL X 248 solid 13 615 N Specifications for Scout X 3A Scout X 3C Whilst there is no reference to a Scout X 3B version the Scout X 3C used an upgraded first stage on its one and only sub orbital flight on 9 October 1964 Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 1 9 14 m 1 14 m 1 Aerojet 40KS B solid 511 582 N 2 6 19 m 0 76 m 1 Thiokol TX 33 solid 244 690 N 3 2 90 m 0 76 m 1 ABL X 259A solid 93 907 N 4 1 49 m 0 51 m 1 ABL X 248 solid 13 615 N Specifications for Scout X 3C Scout X 3M The Scout X 3M used the MG 18 upper stage Two flights took place on 19 February 1963 and 20 July 1963 of which the first placed a 40 kg payload into orbit Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 1 9 14 m 1 14 m 1 Aerojet 40KS A solid 458 183 N 2 6 19 m 0 76 m 1 Thiokol TX 33 solid 244 690 N 3 2 90 m 0 76 m 1 ABL X 259A solid 93 907 N 4 1 49 m 0 51 m 1 LPC Redlands MG 18 solid Specifications for Scout X 3M Scout X 4 Thirteen flights were conducted with the Scout X 4 between 28 June 1963 and 6 December 1965 One of these failed whilst another one was sub orbital The Scout X 4 was capable of placing a 103 kg payload into low Earth orbit Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 1 9 14 m 1 14 m 1 Aerojet 40KS B solid 511 582 N 2 6 19 m 0 76 m 1 Thiokol TX 33 solid 244 690 N 3 2 90 m 0 76 m 1 ABL X 259A solid 93 907 N 4 1 49 m 0 51 m 1 ABL X 258 solid 22 250 N Specifications for Scout X 4 Scout X 4A The Scout X 4A used an upgraded first stage Three sub orbital flights to test re entry vehicles were conducted between 18 August 1964 and 24 June 1968 Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 1 9 14 m 1 14 m 1 Aerojet 40KS A solid 458 183 N 2 6 19 m 0 76 m 1 Thiokol TX 33 solid 244 690 N 3 2 90 m 0 76 m 1 ABL X 259A solid 93 907 N 4 1 49 m 0 51 m 1 ABL X 258 solid 22 250 N Specifications for Scout X 4A Scout X 5A The Scout X 5A was the only three stage version of the Scout launcher and one was flown on a sub orbital flight on 27 April 1968 Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 1 9 14 m 1 14 m 1 Aerojet 40KS B solid 511 582 N 2 6 19 m 0 76 m 1 Thiokol TX 354 solid 280 285 N 3 2 90 m 0 76 m 1 ABL X 259A solid 93 907 N Specifications for Scout X 5A Scout A The Scout A was used for launches in the Transit NNSS series placing two satellites in orbit at the same time Twelve such flights were conducted between 21 December 1965 and 27 August 1970 In addition one was used to launch a British scientific satellite The launch capability was 122 kg into a low Earth orbit Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 1 9 14 m 1 14 m
    http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app3/lv-1.html (2012-12-09)

  • Lockheed Martin SLV-4/SLV-5/SB-4/SB-5/SB-6 Titan
    Titan IIIB with two strap ons a Centaur D E third stage and a Burner 2 fourth stage It was to be used for deep space missions but development was not proceeded with Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 0 2 Algol 2 solid 564 265 N each 1 22 22 m 3 05 m 2 Aerojet LR87 AJ 11 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 2 339 852 N 2 7 50 m 3 05 m 1 Aerojet LR91 AJ 11 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 453 730 N 3 9 60 m 3 05 m 2 P W RL 10A 3 1 or 3 Lox LH2 131 227 N 4 0 80 m 0 70 m 1Thiokol Star 37 solid 43 553 N Specifications for Titan IIIBAS2 Titan IIIC The next version was the Titan IIIC which was basically similar to the Titan IIIA but with the addition of two United Technologies 1205 solid fuelled boosters to the first stage These boosters had a length of 25 90 m and a diameter of 3 05 m whilst the launch vehicle s total length was 35 05 m depending on the payload carried Initially proposed to be used with the X 20 Dyna Soar this configuration was capable to place a payload of 13 150 kg into low Earth orbit It was used between 18 June 1965 and 6 March 1982 Of the 36 flights 2 failed During the 1970s the launch vehicle was also referred to as Titan 3 23 C The vehicle had a length of up to 48 76 m depending on the size of the payload carried Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 0 2 United Tech 1205 solid 5 849 620 N each 1 22 22 m 3 05 m 2 Aerojet LR87 AJ 11 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 2 339 852 N 2 7 50 m 3 05 m 1 Aerojet LR91 AJ 11 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 453 730 N 3 4 60 m 3 05 m 2 Aerojet AJ 10 138 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 71 199 N Specifications for Titan IIIC Titan IIIC7 The Titan IIIC7 was a 1965 proposal that would use a lengthened Transtage third stage with as well as upgraded solid boosters with a length of 34 10 m The version was not further developed Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 0 2 United Tech 1207 solid 7 117 725 N each 1 22 22 m 3 05 m 2 Aerojet LR87 AJ 11 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 2 339 852 N 2 7 50 m 3 05 m 1 Aerojet LR91 AJ 11 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 453 730 N 3 5 30 m 3 05 m 2 Aerojet AJ 10 138 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 71 199 N Specifications for Titan IIIC7 Titan IIID The Titan IIID was similar to the Titan IIIC but with the deletion of the Transtage upper stage It is however believed that some Titan IIID vehicles were used with an additional Agena D upper stage In this configuration the vehicle was capable to place 12 300 kg into a low Earth orbit It had a length of up to 48 76 m depending on the size of the payload carried The vehicle was used 24 times between 15 June 1971 and 28 August 1985 Of these one was a failure Photo Author s collection Titan IIID Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 0 2 United Tech 1205 solid 5 849 620 N each 1 22 22 m 3 05 m 2 Aerojet LR87 AJ 11 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 2 339 852 N 2 7 50 m 3 05 m 1 Aerojet LR91 AJ 11 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 453 730 N Specifications for Titan IIID Titan IIIE The Titan IIIE was built specifically for NASA as a launch vehicle for its deep space missions The first two stages were identical to the Titan IIIC On top of this was a third stage consisting of a Centaur D1T upper stage This stage developed a thrust of 133 375 N For the two Helios missions in 1974 and 1976 a further stage was added which was propelled by a Thiokol TE M 364 4 solid fuelled motor The length of the four stage launch vehicle was up to 48 76 m depending on the payload it carried and it had a capability to place payload of up to 15 400 kg into orbit Seven flights were conducted between 11 February 1974 and 5 September 1977 of which one failed Photo Author s collection Titan IIIE Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 0 2 United Tech 1205 solid 5 849 620 N each 1 22 22 m 3 05 m 2 Aerojet LR87 AJ 11 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 2 339 852 N 2 7 50 m 3 05 m 1 Aerojet LR91 AJ 11 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 453 730 N 3 9 60 m 3 05 m 2 P W RL 10A 3 3 Lox LH2 131 227 N Specifications for Titan IIIE Titan IIIL The Titan IIIL was a mid 1960s proposal for a launcher to place heavy payloads into low Earth orbit Its principal feature was a larger diameter first stage to accommodate four engines rather than two A version with four strap ons was also considered Neither version proceeded beyond the early design stage as there were no perceived payloads that required these launch vehicles Stage Length Diameter Engine Fuel Thrust 0 2 United Tech 1207 solid 7 117 725 N each 1 29 90 m 4 88 m 4 Aerojet LR87 AJ 7 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 4 334 618 N 2 13 40 m 4 88 m 1 Aerojet LR91 AJ 7 N 2 O 4 Aerozine 444 835 N 3 9 60 m 3 05 m 2 P W RL 10A 3 1 or 3 Lox LH2 131 227 N Specifications for Titan IIIL
    http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app3/b-6.html (2012-12-09)

  • IAI/AAI RQ-2 Pioneer
    a rocket booster On U S Navy ships the Pioneer is launched by a MK 125 MOD 2 solid propellant rocket booster giving a thrust of 3 78 kN 859 lb for 2 seconds The UAV can either land on a runway using a tailhook to catch an arresting wire or fly into a recovery net for ship board recovery It is equipped with an autopilot an inertial navigation system and a two way C band datalink Although it can fly a preprogrammed mission the usual mode of operation is manual remote control using video provided by the datalink Maximum range of the line of sight datalink is 185 km 100 nm The RQ 2A can be equipped with a wide variety of mission payloads and one of the most imporant ones is the Wescam DS 12 EO IR Electro Optical Infrared sensor Typical tasks for the UAV are naval gunfire support reconnaissance target acquisition and BDA Bomb Damage Assessment Photo U S Navy RQ 2A The Pioneer UAVs were first used operationally in Operation Desert Storm in early 1991 They were quite successful and their deployment significantly contributed to the increasing recognition of UAVs as valid combat elements in the 1990s Since then the Navy has retired its battleships but there are five Austin class amphibious landing ships which were modified to deploy a Pioneer system if the need arises The U S Army s Pioneer systems were transferred to the Navy in 1995 after the former service had received BQM 155 RQ 5 Hunter UAVs as replacement During the 1990s about 50 additional RQ 2 airframes were delivered mainly as attrition replacements A number of improvements have been implemented and therefore the latest batch of new built RQ 2s ordered in 1997 has been designated RQ 2B This
    http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app2/q-2.html (2012-12-09)

  • Lockheed Martin RQ-3 DarkStar
    the program was stopped again after the first prototype crashed on take off for its second flight in April that year because of a control system malfunction leading to pitch up and stall In January 1997 the DarkStar was officially designated RQ 3A and in June 1998 flight testing finally resumed with the second RQ 3A vehicle Photo USAF RQ 3A The RQ 3A was a LO flying wing design with a very slightly forward swept wing and a flying saucer shaped fuselage section It was powered by a single Williams F129 Model FJ44 1A turbofan engine and could cruise for about 12 hours at an altitude of up to 19800 m 65000 ft For the planned fully autonomous missions the DarkStar was equipped with a GPS INS navigation system which could be retasked in flight Communication was done via two way datalinks command and control uplink sensor data downlink either a wideband line of sight link or a J band SATCOM link The payload bays in the lower fuselage could accommodate various types of sensors but the primary options were a Northrop Grumman AN ZPQ 1 TESAR Tactical Endurance Synthetic Aperture Radar surveillance radar or a Recon Optical CA 236 electro optical camera system Photo Tony Landis NASA RQ 3A The problems and delays of DarkStar lead to rising costs and in January 1999 the USAF decided that the advantages of the RQ 3A over the less ambitious RQ 4 Global Hawk were not sufficient to warrant completion of the development program At least officially the program was cancelled and the two DarkStar ACTD vehicles remained the only RQ 3As built However it appears that this was not quite the end of the story because during Operation Iraqi Freedom in March April 2003 the USAF acknowledged the operational use
    http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app2/q-3.html (2012-12-09)

  • (MQ-12)
    Parsch MQ 12 In 2006 the designation YMQ 12A had been requested by the U S Army for the prototypes of the Warrior ERMP Extended Range Multi Purpose Unmanned Aerial System but the request was turned down by DOD and the vehicle was designated as YMQ 1C instead However the Q 12 slot has not been allocated otherwise and is presumably held open for a possible re evaluation of the
    http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app2/q-12.html (2012-12-09)

  • Boeing Ground-Based Interceptor
    equipped with an infrared seeker which is comprised of focal plane arrays and a cooling assembly attached to an optical telescope The seeker software has to detect and track all incoming objects discriminate warheads from decoys and steer the EKV to a head on collision with a target at closing speeds of more than 25700 km h 16000 mph The EKV s manoeuvering system known as DACS Divert and Attitude Control System has four rocket thrusters around the vehicle s body The vehicle weighs approximately 63 kg 140 lb is 140 cm 55 in long and about 60 cm 24 in in diameter Photo Boeing Raytheon EKV used on flight IFT 9 Integrated Flight Tests GBI tests which include a kill vehicle are designated in the IFT Integrated Flight Test series as opposed to pure booster tests which are designated BV see booster section All IFT flights up to IFT 10 have used the Lockheed Martin PLV Payload Launch Vehicle as a booster because no purpose built GBI booster had been ready The PLV consists of the upper two stages of surplus LGM 30F Minuteman II ICBMs Aerojet SR19 AJ 1 and Hercules M57A1 The designation NLGM 30F allocated to Minuteman IIs converted to test vehicles is possibly used for the PLVs The IFT target missiles not only deploy a dummy warhead but also balloon decoys of varying number and size Photos Boeing Lockheed Martin PLV left IFT 6 right IFT 8 The first intercept attempt by the Raytheon EKV occurred during flight IFT 3 on 2 October 1999 Despite a failure in the EKV s IMU Inertial Measurement Unit the mock warhead was successfully intercepted IFT 4 on 18 January 2000 failed to intercept the warhead because of a failure in the EKV s sensor cooling system and IFT 5 on 8 July 2000 was also unsuccessful because the EKV did not separate from the booster Tests IFT 6 on 14 July 2001 and IFT 7 on 3 December 2001 repeated IFT 5 but were the first to use the XBR X Band Radar developed for the operational system earlier tests used an older radar and largely relied on a beacon in the mock warhead for target tracking data XBR performance in IFT 6 was unsatisfactory but IFT 6 and 7 both successfully intercepted the warhead In all tests up to IFT 7 only a single large decoy balloon was used which had a much brighter IR signature than the dummy warhead This made it comparatively easy for the EKV s seeker logic to discriminate warhead and decoy and is certainly not a combat realistic scenario IFT 8 on 15 March 2002 used three decoys one large and two small ones However every decoy still had a significantly different IR signature than the mock warhead and the EKV was given discrimination data prior to the test IFT 9 on 14 October 2002 was presumably similar to IFT 8 but MDA has classified decoy information from this test on but
    http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app4/gbi.html (2012-12-09)